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in alabama heads into the fifth day. >>> leon panetta said his catholic religion had an impact on his life and death decisions. >>> and rumors of muhammad ali's death are premature. we'll explain. death are premature. we'll explain. "early today" starts right now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> very good monday morning to you. i'm veronica de la cruz. we begin with a developing tragedy in southern california. a bus carrying a tour group from tijuana collided with two other vehicles on the highway west of los angeles killing eight and injuring more. authorities say the driver reported brake problems as the bus came down the mountain. it rear-ended a car before flipping and hitting a pickup truck that was hauling a trailer. passengers described the scene. >> starts to move so fast, and the people start screaming. >> two or three minutes swerving in and out? >> yeah. >> everybody was scared. everybody was screaming. >> the bus was reportedly returning from a ski outing to big bear. >>> well, today president obama will travel to minneapolis to push his proposal for broader g
is. i went from republicans to independents, to democrat. three reasons. number one, i want religion out of the party. i have a religion. that's my business. i have a political party. that's the political parties business. number two, women's issues. i don't personally believe in abortion, but i don't believe i have the rights tell my neighbor what they should do. i think the republican party needs to get out of people's bedrooms and back into the boardrooms. number three, the middle-class tax hikes their break-in instituted. we never recovered from that. to my city unions. all things that had middle-class workers. ending tax like state sales tax, all of these things it is strictly, so i know when it happened. it was in the reagan years. >> host: thanks, caller. >> guest: >> guest: a few republican come you a liberal one. undertake the supporters. she says she wants religion out of politics. i wonder she would've felt that way about the civil rights movement because it is actually martin luther king was not only a top her. he was also the reverend dr. martin luther king. the power of
-rights laws that prohibit firing, promoting and hiring based on race, age, national origin, religion, pregnancy, those immutable characteristics that we think are worthy of the protection of our civil rights laws. in most states there are modest exemptions to the employment at will dadoctrine, amount wrongful discharge. when an employer requires someone to break the law in order to keep their job. or if an employer is doing something that is in violation of a well-defined written public policy. other than that, we give employers in this country wi de latitude, because we have a free market economy, because we recognize the person that takes the risk and set up a business and puts their monetary and human capital into it, that they have rights to run their business the way they see fit. we are very, very reluctant to place any sort of restrictions on that. again, this is a small one. not saying that you have to hire anybody that is not fully qualified for your job. in essence, what these laws do rainout are saving employers from themselves, because if they are ignoring all of the unem
in prayer each week, members of the prayer caucus also work together to preserve the presence of religion, faith and morality in the marketplace of ideas. we're seeing increased efforts to remove references to god and fate from the public square. activists seek to remove god from our national motto and pledge of allegiance. they seek to prevent city and county councils from praying and recognizing our nation's spiritual heritage. and they seek to silence people who wish to live out their faith. members of the prayer caucus have countered these efforts successfully, ensuring that our history remains in tact for future generations. in the 112th congress, i introduced a resolution reaffirming our national motto, in god we trust, and encouraging its public display in public buildings. the measure passed overwhelmingly by a vote of 396-0. some asked why we needed to reaffirm our national motto. yet if left unstated, the motto could be changed in a de facto matter. in november, 2010, before a worldwide audience and a much publicized speech focusing on the united states relationship -- united st
for the president and members of congress to show off their religion one day a year? >> i think it's very odd. i think that there is a little too much overt religiosity going on. and then it suddenly put back in the pocket and then -- >> bill: no, i agree. i grew up under the creed that you did not wear your religion on your sleeve. and you know, you had it. it was real. it was genuine but you didn't brag about it. the problem i have with the prayer breakfast is everybody gets up and tries to outdo each other and how my faith is so strong and i pray all the time and i'm so close to jesus. come on. >> right. exactly. >> bill: it is not something to brag about. i don't think it's real if you brag about it. >> are you allowed to be diverse at the prayer breakfast? >> bill: no. no. it is one way. something else, sort of kind of related. we talked earlier in the week, victoria, about the fact that we've struggled with same-sex marriage in this country for so long, the president came around on it last year after evolving, he said. he did evolve. in the right direction. and took him a long time. but st
in the classrooms, particularly say on the subject of religion? >> well, in the hearing, i asked the question about a less on on islam that was sent to me by an enterprising parent and let me share this with you, alisyn, it was parents doing their homework and trying to get information that brought this to our committee's attention and so they found this lesson on islam and in texas we do teach all religions and students should learn about all religions, parents, i found it odd a full lesson on islam and not equal on christianity or any other religion. in the last segment, the answer was we changed that and that's not the program now and that's the danger of online learning, online learning is the future and it's terrific that, that's how students learn. if they're learning history and see the name patrick henry and it's linked to patrick henry, they can go in areas they can never go in a textbook. >> that's the wave of the future, so, how can you be sure of what the kids in texas and across the country are going to be taught. how can you change this curriculum now? >> yes. >> well, we're going to
says he's not homophobic but stands by his religion. the oregon department of justice is investigating. >>> finally in missouri, a kansas city church is showing a sign of support for gay boy scouts. the church posted a gay pride banner, welcoming all members of the boy scouts of america. the youths organization is set to discuss lifting the ban on gays and lesbians this week. >>> turning to sports, super bowl xlvii looked like a blowout. but turned out to be a thriller. in the first quarter, ravens' quarterback joe flacco connected with antoine bolden for touchdown pass and early lead. in the second, baltimore scored two more touchdowns to make it look like a blowout. they went to halftime with the 21-3 lead. in the third, the ravens' jacoby jones had a record with a 109-yard kickoff return. the longest in super bowl history. and that made it 28-6, ravens over the 49ers. then the power goes out in the superdome. it took 34 minutes before the lights were back on and play was restarted. then momentum shifted quickly as san francisco scored two touchdowns in less than 2 1/2 minutes. in th
poor of all colors stripes tongues and religions that your country wronged you in separate and discrete ways, gronke with horrific and lingering consequences, wronged you in some cases from long ago and for a very long time, to a degree that would morally compel any civilized nation serious and sustained attention. >> guest: we don't want to talk about it. we still don't want to talk about it. we run from it. we now call it victimization, so it's not to be raised. it's a sad truth. >> host: why did you leave the country? >> guest: well i was as much going to a place as leaving a place. i have been going to st. kitts in the caribbean for 25 years, and it's a small island. it is made for someone like me who doesn't like big crowded places, big cities. it's an exquisitely beautiful place with mountains and clear blue water and a kind of smallness that allows the kind of intimacy you seldom go downtown and don't see someone that you know. but the biggest piece of it is that the woman i loved and married is from st. kitts, so we had decided many years ago that we were going to build a home t
of resistance to federal rule in new mexico. what is going on today with the rich and diverse bodies of religion in santa fe, but we constructed that on top of this foundation of faith being part of santa fe's history from the very start. santa fe has been the subject of many books by many writers, a diverse range of writers, and this book has a terrific bibliography for anyone who wants to read more about santa fe. >> and now more from santa fe, new mexico, home to about 80,000 people and 250 art galleries. santa fe boasts a rich historical and literary culture. with the help of our local cable partner, comcast, booktv takes a tour of collected works bookstore, one of santa fe's 17 independent bookstores. >> welcome to collected works bookstore and coffeehouse. we're in santa fe, new mexico. my name is dorothy massey, and my daughter and co-owner have owned collected works for the last 18 of its now 35 years old as santa fe's oldest and, we think, best in the city. santa fe has a population of 80,000 people, and it supports no less than 17 independent bookstores. how does collected works and th
dalton from license to kill. >> deep beneath is a mental illness. >> i like history, religion, politics. >> you don't love your child less. you love them probably more. sometimes i think elliott was put here on earth for us just to see if we could make it through with all this. >> i'm a good person. >> smart. >> smart, intelligent. >> beat dad on jeopardy. >> usually beat dad on jeopardy. snow a lot of memories in this book. >> misdiagnosed with a.d.d. as a first grader, it took years for elliott to get the correct diagnosis. afternoon bergers sin -- as bergers -- asperger's syndrome. >> he went to a dumpster and started banging his head on the dumpster. if that doesn't brick your heart, i don't know what does, to see someone go through that. and now to look at him. >> i was just delusional. >> but you're doing so good now. >> there were years of heart break and struggle, including the night he head-butted his father and the family was forced to call 911. >> elliott was thrown to the ground by a police officer, handcuffed, and shackles put on his feet. that was very hard to see. as a ma
of religion without our constitution. the professor says it's up to those who believe in those ideaing to convince fellow americans they are worth withholding. shannon bream, fox news. >> harris: a huge power ball jackpot is up for grabs. we will tell you how much is up for grabs. leaping into frigid waters for a great cause. they do testify year but this time was a little bit different. ♪ using cloud computing and mobile technology, verizon innovators have developed a projective display for firefighters. allowing them to see through anything. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. [beep] [indistinct chatter] [kids talking at once] [speaking foreign language] [heart beating] [heartbeat continues] [faint singing] [heartbeat, music playing louder] ♪ i'm feeling better since you know me ♪ ♪ i was a lonely soul, but that's the old me... ♪ announcer: this song was created with heartbeats of children in need. find out how it can help frontline health workers bring hope to millions of children at everybeatmatters.org. >> harr
guarantee things like freedom of religion without our constitution. the professor says it's up to those who believe in those ideaing to convince fellow americans they are worth withholding. shannon bream, fox news. >> harris: a huge power ball jackpot is up for grabs. we will tell you how much is up for grabs. leaping into frigid waters for a great cause. they do testify year but this time was a little bit different. ♪ so, i'm working on a cistern intake valve, and the guy hands me a locknut wrench. no way! i'm like, what is this, a drainpipe slipknot? wherever your business takes you, nobody keeps you on the rd like progressive commercial auto. [ flo speaking japanese ] [ shouting in japanese ] we work wherever you work. now, that's progressive. call or click today. >> harris: pony chilling day out for a good cause. thick skinned new yorkers stripping down and taking a dip in the ice cold atlantic for the rock away plunge raising money for a teenager suffering from a life threatening disease. this year had it had a any purpose. >> we're having a plunge that is usually for cystic fibrosis
's almost a religion. rhea: there are so many shoes here. so i'm gonna pick them up and you tell us what we have here. gay: okay, that is a victorian shoe. and you can see the fancy little spool heel, and a lot of the victorian shoes were very pointy. and then you would use your button hook to fasten your button right here. rhea: what about this? gay: okay, that is quite the fancy shoe. that's from about 1917. that's an edwardian shoe. and you can see that they were still using buttons. and the welt is striped, it's got your patent and your kidskin here; you got your wooden stacked heel in the back. it's just got everything. rhea: this is beautiful. i think this is a really really elegant shoe. gay: and that is a '20s shoe. you can see all the deco styling on it. and one of the nicer things they did, that they're not doing yet is this gorgeous little tassel. rhea: here's our next one. gay: and that's a '30s shoe. they started getting thicker heels in the '30s, a little bit more girly, little bit less of the deco look. and that is what we call a "south beach sky high," and
they are doing so or not. >> when asked how we would guarantee things like freedom of religion without our constitution. the professor says it's up to those who believe in those ideaing to convince fellow americans they are worth withholding. shannon bream, fox news. >> harris: a huge power ball jackpot is up for grabs. we will tell you how much is up for grabs. leaping into frigid waters for a great cause. they do testify year but this time was a little bit different. ♪ [ male announcer ] why do more emergency workers everywhere trust duracell...?? duralock power preserve. locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. now...guaranteed. duracell with duralock. trusted everywhere. [ construction sounds ] ♪ [ watch ticking ] [ engine revs ] come in. ♪ got the coffee. that was fast. we're outta here. ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ but we can still help you see your big picture. with the fidelity guided portfolio summary, you choose which accounts to track and use fidelity's analytics to spot trends, gain insights, and figure out what you want to do next. all in one place. i'm meredith stoddard
. the state has become the major religion in this country. the icons in washington -- they have to destroy every aspect of people who hold to a higher moral authority. host: the headline in this morning "the wall street journal" -- castle in michigan, on our lands for democrats. -- ethel in michigan, on our line for democrats. caller: my question is, what happened between the separation between church and state? i believe this is more of a legal issue than a religious issue. the religious issue is for the contraceptive. i can understand that. why is this being mixed in with state issues? he did not have to take them if you do not want them, if you do not believe in them. don't use them. i just cannot understand why this does not go away. i am really quite tired of it all. thank you. host: more from the article in this morning's "the wall street journal." they write -- the new rules would require insurers to pay the up-front cost. our next call comes from carol in ohio, on our line for democrats. caller: good morning. i am totally against what the catholic church and republicans are doing a
together who did not usually come together. we were not bounded in a common race or religion. we are not a theocracy. we are not a minority. this nation was born with the ideals that a united people, but these ideals compel every generation to be more inclusive and welcoming. we realize this country was not a zero some political nation. in fact, the more we open up this country to inclusion, the better we are. women joining the work force has not diminished men. it expands our economy and opportunity for all. the education of poor people in the inner-city does not take away from others, it expands our economy and makes us all do better. this is the ideal of our country. as the rabbi would tell me, the jewish saying, that jews together are strong, but jews with other people are invincible. he african saying that spiderwebs united can tie up a line. the very principle of this country, one of my advisers told me one of the fundamental principles of islam. the oneness of the community. we recognize dependency and see strength. that became the problem solving idea that i took on. i be
happy to sponsor boy scouts and then they get more kids interested in the mormon religion. >> stephanie: oh, wow. so it's the mormons that are recruiting, not the gays. >> do they get the same prizes we do. >> stephanie: my toaster is lovely. >> even the mormons could -- as they did in the -- what is it, late '70s allow african-americans into the priesthood. they would have a revelation. >> stephanie: stop baptizing dead yous. >> exactly >> stephanie: words of the immortal judy tenuta. it could happen. back with more with matthew breen of "the advocate"." >> announcer: it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ i want the people who watch our show, to be able to come away armed with the facts, and the arguments to feel confident in their positions. i want them to have the data and i want them to have the passion. ♪ >> announcer: stephanie miller. ♪ freedom, freedom, freedom ♪ >> stephanie: it is the "stephanie miller show." welcome to it. twenty-one minutes after the hour. our guest live in studio, because he's so handsome and romantic. matthew breen, e
as you would have them do unto you. all cultures and races and religions. >> is that him. >> he is not in the painting. that is a farmer that was a end from of his in vermont where he lived at the time. >> who is this over here. >> one of my favorites. you can almost taste the turkey. >> quintessential thanksgiving piece. done for a very serious purpose during world war ii to articulate president roosevelts four freedoms. freedom of speech, freedom from want. fear dom from fear and freedom to worship. these are the reasons america went into war to preserve these freedoms for people all over the world. >> he also made statements too, look at this. >> after he stopped working for the saturday evening post where he had done 321 magazine covers through the his lifetime went to work for look magazine. the subject matter changed greatly and he he started painting the current events of the day and did some very important civil rights movement paintings. this young girl is walking to school will protected by the u.s. marshals i want indicating the first elementary school in new orleans.
's almost a religion there. people are dedicated to it. our two boys, i grew up a football fanatic and our boys played soccer. we were against them going into football because of the head injuries. the difference between soccer and football is two days a week practice versus five days a week. >> we are going to stay on this. we have much more to talk about including our complicity as viewers, lovers of the game in this question. stay there. up next, football's toughest call. why some players are willing to risk their health for what feels like big money and a better life. [ snoring ] ♪ [ snoring ] [ male announcer ] zzzquil™ sleep-aid. [ snoring ] [ snoring ] [ male announcer ] it's not for colds. it's not for pain. it's just for sleep. [ snoring ] [ male announcer ] because sleep is a beautiful thing™. [ birds chirping ] zzzquil™. the non-habit forming sleep-aid from the makers of nyquil®. ♪ wears off. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. the end of trial and error has arrived. t
the american middle class. it was because we had to bowed down to the religion of the free market and what has never been repaid beentarp is the double standard that when these plutocrats got into trouble, all that garbage about the free market science and milton friedman got thrown right out the window. it is the double standard, the hypocrisy, the contradiction -- that can never be repaid, thank you. guest: the caller raises a really interesting point. this is something i put a report out on this past week. one thing we learned in 2008 was that our financial system was very vulnerable to these highly interconnected financial institutions, too big to fill up companies and not only were they highly interconnected with each other -- we learn that their failure threatened american jobs and american pensions and mortgages. that was really shocking. i don't think regulators were prepared to deal with that. even with the bailout coming and preventing the failure of some of these institutions, there was trillions of dollars in american wealth that went out the door. that is a root cause of the finan
the swamp and what it does, it is radicalizing people that are standing up against militants using religion as a mobilizing force. so i think that drones as an instrument may have had some secrecy in terms of position, but -- and it's like saying, well, we can't allow u.s. f-16s to come in, we use our own to run anti-terror operations when we can, when we are able to move the population and protect them. so drones are now -- we don't see them as productive at all. >> what do you tell the germ's staff -- what do you tell the staff -- >> you need to be a fly on that committee wall. >> jonathan. >> i think we are all. on the same page. members of the general's staff on where the future of this -- pakistan has to take ownership of all anti-terror operations, absolutely all of them for them to be sustainable and to be seen as legitimate in the eyes of our people. you know, there have been a lot of drone strikes next door also. and in any case, you know that al qaeda is the whole al qaeda high valleys is pretty much through our cooperation and joint efforts. and that's something this administrati
, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agree to those values and the declaration, universal declaration of human rights and will stand up to them. it's not always easy in the have to pick our time. we can't be shortsighted or to penicillin continue to stand up for them. on the fundamental first level, we do what we do because it's in our security interest from economic interest in moral interest and we have to continue to do that. but as you go to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever, more agile and wish i had do that. for example are adtran, -- there are those who estimate that maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremists in the world, but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. but we try to do is say briefly mention is to get in there with them, undermine them and we've got them. it is something i did quite well in the cold war. the wife done this job, the more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some mono
of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values in the declaration, universal declaration of human rights and will stand up for them. it's not always easy and we have to pick our time. we can't be shortsighted or did, but will continue to stand up for them. and the fundamental first level, we do what we do because it's in our security interest, economic interests in more interests and we have to continue to do that. but then as you go to the second level, how you adapt that to the world that today requires us to be more clever, more agile and were trying to do that. for example, countering violent extremism, does this to me there are maybe 50,000 violent homicidal extremists in the world, but they are able to maximize their impact and messaging today and are not and what we try to do is to get in there with him, to undermine non-and to rebut them. to dissent than we did quite well in the cold war. the more i've done this job, the more i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. no, we don't have some monolithic communist soviet union. but we
people standing up against militants and terrorists, using a religion, for instead as a mobilizing force. i think that charles is an instrument have had some efficacy in terms of precision. it's like saying, you know, we can't allow u.s. f-16s to come in. we use our road to an anti-terror operations when we can, when we are able to move the population and protect them. so you know, we don't see them as part of it at all. [inaudible] >> excuse me? [inaudible] >> you need to be a very big five on that committee will. but i think we are all in the same page now. members of the staff found where the future of this size. pakistan has to take ownership of absolutely all of them to be sustainable and be seen as legitimate in the eyes of ip hole. you know, there's been a lot of churn strikes next-door also. and in any case, you know the whole al qaeda is pretty much through our cooperation and joint efforts pretty much degraded. that said the administration will agree to also. >> thank you very much. you talk about the process in afghanistan being led. president karzai presents a pakistan and un
that we're the greatest country, because we're all different nationalities and all different religions and we should show the rest of the world how to behave. >> with reference to the nazis, what was that? >> well, he fought in the battle of the bulge. he's a war hero. so that's the reference. >> so the fact that he was obviously dramatically influenced by world war ii? >> exactly. >> and that's still part of your life right now. and that's what -- you see some connection with your experience -- >> well, violence has to be stopped. >> war is the lowest form of human behavior. killing is the worst form of -- you know, i just finished writing a book -- i'm not plugging it right now, but i wrote, life is a gift. we are blessed with being alive. we should enjoy it and enjoy our neighbors and help our cousins and relatives and friends, one another. we should all help one another. it's a gift. we have a gift with our lives. >> well, mr. bennett, danny, tony bennett, thank you both for coming in. if you won't sing, we're going to play some clips that we love to hear from you. >> i love this v
on the stand, all the talk of sex and religion. what is going on? >> two tracks here. they're trying to show travis alexander the victim in this case as a sexual deviant. this is a mormon community, could be there are mormons, also people that have conservative views on that jury, and so they're trying to appeal to those people on that jury. not only that, they're trying to show he had control over her. and that's the domestic violence part of this. self-defense, she's got to prove that in that moment, she says travis, she dropped travis alexander, this is a year or so after what we're seeing now. she drops his camera, travis alexander comes at her, she has to use deadly force, extreme deadly force on him. all of that is couched in the idea she was in this alexander and she was in a domestically violent relationship. and then they will have an expert on to say that she was a battered woman. >> cross-examination is going to be interesting. ryan smith, is sunny hostin, my thanks to both of you. make sure you check ryan on hln's "evening express" at 5:00 p.m. eastern. >>> we're getting word fr
's religion. at the boxing match just before the bell rang one of the boxes made the sign of the cross. the priest said, it does not mean anything if you cannot fight. we bless ourselves with the hope everything will be ok in this country. it does not mean anything unless you're willing to fight for it. my message to you is that it does not mean a thing if you are not willing to fight for the american dream. the drama -- that torch of duty is as into a new generation. with it passes the responsibility to never stop fighting for the better future. think you very much. god bless you. god bless the united states of america. [applause] i will take a few questions. call ahead. >> thank you. thank you for coming to georgetown university and talking to us. i am in the security studies program here. i am taking a class on u.s. defense budgeting. at georgetown, we do care about these issues and we share your concerns, as well. in the defense budget of 2013, i understand 19% of the budget is being represented for personnel. about 26% is for procurement. 40% is for operations. if you look at all
that have? >> they're trying to say he was controlling her sexually and through religion. the question about the impact depends on whether the jurors believe her. it becomes really important exactly how she's describing it. she seems nervous at times. she's trying to seem uncomfortable. if the jurors don't believe that reaction, that's a big problem. if the jurors do believe that, that's entirely helpful. so, while we talk about the graphic nature and the salacious nature of the testimony, actually, the way she's responding to it becomes even more important. >> all right. there will be much, much more to tell. >> the cross-examination is still coming, next week. >> dan abrams, thank you very much. >>> time, now, for the weather. and sam champion, a lot to talk about, too, sam. >> we also have some fog that was -- yesterday, we had so much of the country with heavy fog. oklahoma city was one of those areas. yesterday, at the zero visibility point, a good part of the country. today, we're looking at more like a quarter-mile in that region. we have the warm temperatures. the long nights this ti
time. it does not matter whether the person is jewish or whether they are any religion. that is a salutation, a greeting of goodwill. we have got to get over this sensitivity. it keeps people from saying what they really believe. i am reminded of a successful young businessman. he loved to buy his mother exotic gifts for mother's day and ran out of ideas. then he ran across these birds. they cost $5,000 apiece, they could dance, they could sing, they could talk. he bought two of them and send them to his mother, could not wait to call him. what did you think of those birds? she said, they were good. [laughter]he said, no, no, you did not eat those birds. they cost $5,000 -- they could dance, sing, talk. she said, they should have said something. [laughter]that is where we end up to if we do not speak up for what we believe. what we need to do -- [applause]what we need to do in this pc world is forget about unanimity of speech and unanimity of thought. we need to concentrate on being respectful to those people with whom we disagree. that is when we begin to make real pro
they are getting religion. in fact, now it's allowing us to have a discussion where there is an acknowledgement of how much has gone into boarder security. that will be a continuing efforts, but there is a huge political, again, economic add vantsage to us if we have a sensible immigration policy with the path to citizenship. the folks who are here many of them have been working. we can get them to be out in the open rather than in the shadows and and they are taxpayers and many of them are very talented. it's going to allow families to be together and probably so i think there is a lot of interest here on the democratic side in a growing awareness on the republican side somehow same way we have to address this in a substantial way. >> wait one other issue congressman. the new york sometimes is reporting that you have introduced legislation dealing with a special benefit sort of that was given one california pharmaceutical company understand obamacare that you are trying to get rid of? >> slipped in, in the fiscal cliff negotiations at the 11th hour. over on the se
for your race or your tribe or your religion or your ideology or your region, whatever, your industry, these days, policy, politics is a lot about power. but we always hope that some people in the discussion of politics, and especially policy, will stand for something bigger, something broader, like the public interest, like freedom and justice, the ideals of the declaration of independence and constitution and the pledge of allegiance. and ideally we hope in washington that that's what think tanks do, that think tanks are separate from abstracted from the day-to-day struggles for either political power or special interest benefits from public policy. and, obviously, there are some who do that better than others but in the platonic ideal of the think tank is one committed to the public interest and even though we may disagree about what the public interest is. some think tanks insist they don't have an ideology, and worldview of perspective, a political philosophy. they are just about analyzing and seeing what works. i'm all in favor of analyzing things and seeing what works, but to d
need to drain the swamp. instead it radicalizes people standing up using religion as a mobilizing force. host: the ambassador made a comment yesterday at a breakfast hosted by the christian science monitor. we covered it. c-span.org to what spoken. the washington times said the ambassador said that the attacks violate pakistani sovereignty and international law. the reaction from the aclu has been besthis -- ronnie in orlando, florida, independent. caller: thank you very much. i think it is absolutely outrageous, but it is just a continuation of outrageous policy that have gone on for the last almost 12 years now. i have to say that the previous caller, it just breaks my heart , in thinking that people that are objecting to these policies are against president obama along racial lines. this is not a racial issue. this is not a democrat versus republican issue. this is an issue that we americans are losing our democracy. our constitution is being shredded. gue natione nat internationally. in order to turn this around, which we have got to do, we did not lose 3,000 the law 9/11 to an outs
, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. we have to continue to do that. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more we are trying to do that. count during a violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not have an up-to-date broadcast
when i talk about freedom of expression, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever we are trying to do that. count during a violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not ha
standing up against militants and terrorists, using our religion, for instance, as a mobilizing force. i think that drones as an instrument may have had some efficacy in terms of decisions, but we cannot allow us f-16's to come in. we use our own to run our anti- terror operations when we can, when we are able to move the population and protect them. drones are really -- we do not see them as productive at all. >> what would you tell the staff? what do you tell a member of the general staff? i think we are all on the same page now. members of the general staff and ourselves, where the future of this lies. pakistan has to take ownership of all anti-terror operations for them to be sustainable and to be seen as legitimate in the eyes of our people. you know, there have been a lot of drone strikes next door, and in any case you know that al qaeda, the whole -- through our cooperation and joint efforts, is pretty much degraded. that is something this administration will agree to also. >> james madison -- as british troops invaded the capital, she is known for saving eight portrait of george
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